Book Reviews

“The Sun is also a Star” by Nicola Yoon Book Review

She is Jamaican… he is Korean. She believes in facts… he believes in fate. On Natasha’s last day in America before she gets deported back to Jamaica, she meets Daniel who is on his way to an interview that will ultimately decide his future. Daniel was set on being a doctor just like the rest of his family, but he did not want to do that his entire life; Natasha knew, however, she wanted to be a scientist of some sort so that she could rely on facts for the rest of her life. Both characters come from strict families that are very opinionated, but all that Natasha and Daniel want to do is get past the overbearing judgements and stereotypes. Throughout the story, Natasha refuses to believe in fate, passion, love and everything else related to that, while Daniel’s mission is to convince her that those values exist and are worth believing in.

Although this novel was a slow read at parts, like when a single day was stretched out for over 300 pages, the writing was romantic and engaging. The plot, how both main characters came from strict families and have their futures pretty much laid out for them, how Natasha and Daniel did not want to go in the directions their families pushed them towards made the book very interesting. The author creatively decided to switch the point of view throughout the story which was a good idea so the reader could hear the thoughts of both main characters. However, the jumping back and forth between perspectives became confusing after a while; the point of view switched almost every three pages, if not less. It was difficult not to look back to previous pages to find who was speaking since the point of view kept on changing. Along with the point of view of the two main characters, some minor characters also got to tell the story and that added to the confusion because sometimes it was a challenge trying to keep track of their names.

Once one gets past that aspect of the book, it was a very quick read. Since each section was so short, it was easy to read over 50 pages in one sitting; the average section seemed to be about three pages long, but some were only about half of one page. The whole book was about 350 pages, but since the portions were so short and lots of space was wasted between sections, it can be conjured that if the writing was compacted, it would only be about two thirds of that, if not less. This novel should receive 4 out of 5 stars because while the plot and the easy nature of the book was compelling, the ending could have been stronger and overall, the book could have contained more details.

Categories: Book Reviews, School News

Leave a Reply